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Things I Did Not Know You Could Do With A Lotus Leaf

This morning I was at the Sankei-en garden in Yokohama at the ungodly hour of 7:00 a.m. to see their field of lotus in bloom, but it was the bonus attractions that really made my day!

Sankei-en has special early weekend opening hours during The Season, because (who knew?) lotus flowers only bloom in the morning, and they don’t sleep in. They open at first light, and are already starting to close up again by 9:00, so ya gotta really strap on your alarm clock to catch them at their peak.

But the good folks at Sankei-en make it worth your while!

It goes without saying that they’ve got lots and lots of gorgeous blooms freshly opened each morning
Most of them are that heavenly shade of lotus pink…
…but if you look hard, you can find a few delicate pink and white ones…
…and white ones with the thinnest picotee edge, hiding among the leaves

But the best part about the special early opening festivities were the hilariously educational exhibits.

If I’m ever stuck on a desert island with only a lotus plant for company, my shower needs are totally covered
And I’ll never be bored, as long as I can dip a lotus leaf into a bowl of dish soap
Here’s a close-up of that trimmed-down bad boy. Huh, in this photo it looks like plastic, but I know it’s a real leaf because I watched the guy cut it!
As you can see, there was no shortage of blooming lotus treasure hunting
And afterwards I took a wee stroll around the rest of the garden…
…which wasn’t too shabby either

Sankei-en’s early opening lotus program: 6:00 – 8:30 am, only on Saturdays, Sundays & national holidays

When: July 13 – August 4 (2019)

Garden admission: ¥700 (Early lotus hours and demonstrations are free once you’re in the gate)

How to get to Sankei-en garden from the Negishi train station

You could walk (it takes about 30 minutes) but it’s faster and easier to take the bus. Here’s how:

• Outside the Negishi train station exit (there’s only one), you’ll see an array of bus stops. The first one to your left is where to catch the buses that stop nearest Sankei-en. The shelter is clearly marked, like this:

See that green sign on the little fence? That’s the place where you line up to take the bus to Sankei-en

You can take the 58, 99 or 101 bus to Sankeien, and they all pick up passengers at this shelter. Tap your transit card on the Suica pad near the driver as you get on (or pay ¥220 for adults or ¥110 for children) then find a seat. The stop you’ll get off at is called Honmoku (本牧) and it’s the eighth stop on non-express buses. The driver will announce it, but it will also be displayed on the electronic signboard above the driver’s head when you get close.

When you get off at Honmoku, you’ll be at a big intersection. From the corner you can see the street you’ll walk down to reach Sankei-en, and also the bus shelter for your return to the station.

Cross the wide street and turn into the smaller one. It’s less than a ten minute walk from there to the garden gate.

And by the way, don’t miss all the amusing stuff that you’ll only see in

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Jonelle Patrick writes novels set in Japan, produces the monthly newsletter Japanagram, and blogs at Only In Japan and The Tokyo Guide I Wish I’d Had

Jonelle Patrick View All

Writing mystery books set in Tokyo is mostly what I do, but I also blog about the odd stuff I see every day in Japan. I'm a graduate of Stanford University and the Sendagaya Japanese Institute in Tokyo, and a member of the International Thriller Writers, the Mystery Writers of America, and Sisters In Crime. When I'm not in Tokyo, I live in San Francisco. I also host a travel site called The Tokyo Guide I Wish I'd Had, so if you're headed to Japan and want to check out the places I take my friends when they're in town, take a look!

5 thoughts on “Things I Did Not Know You Could Do With A Lotus Leaf Leave a comment

  1. Great photos and yes Who Knew? Great description of getting there. Am enjoying your posts.

    D🍵❣️

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    • Thank you, Diane! And ha, I hadn’t been to that garden for over a year, so even I had some qualms about the bus thing. Once I got to Negishi, I remembered, but why not make it easier for everyone else?

    • Thanks! (Although I always feel sort of guilty taking credit for Japan photos, because they practically take themselves. I think you’d have to be seriously camera-impaired to take a bad photo of a lotus lol)

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