The Best SECRET Cherry Blossom Spots In Tokyo!

SecretFeat

Cherry blossoms and crowds go together like long bathroom lines and hanami parties, but at these secret Tokyo spots, you can enjoy the pinkness without getting trampled, even at peak season! Here are my favorite places:

ARK HILLS

New for 2019!

The Ark Hills development in Roppongi is nothing to write home about…until you see the cherry trees in full bloom on the streets running through it
They’re lovely during the day, but turn into a truly spectacular tunnel o’ pinkness when they’re lit up at night

Best time to go: It’s pretty uncrowded all the time but it’s best when the lanterns are lit at twilight (from 17:00)

Admission: Free

MONZEN-NAKACHO

Cherry trees bloom like crazy along this little-known canal near Monzen-Nakacho Station. You can get amazing pictures from the bridges that criss-cross the water at easily-walkable intervals!
Cherry trees bloom like crazy along this little-known canal near Monzen-Nakacho Station. You can get amazing pictures from the bridges that criss-cross the water at easily-walkable intervals!
You can walk all along the water on this lovely (and deserted!) path, lined with paper lanterns.
You can walk all along the water on this lovely (and deserted!) path, lined with paper lanterns.
From 18:00 on, the lanterns are lit, and this becomes the most romantic twilight stroll in town.
From 18:00 on, the lanterns are lit, and this becomes the most romantic twilight stroll in town.
The lights stay on until 21:00, so you can enjoy the reflections on the water.
The lights stay on until 21:00, so you can enjoy the reflections on the water.

Best time to go: It’s uncrowded all the time (weekend days are busiest), but I like it best when the lanterns are lit at twilight.

Admission: Free

ASAKUSA CHERRY TREE PROMENADE

If you're really lucky, this lovely promenade will have water cascading down the center, but even when it's dry, it's a wonderful place to walk and eat your bento.
If you’re really lucky, this lovely promenade will have water cascading down the center, but even when it’s dry, it’s a wonderful place to walk and eat your bento.
Look the other way (toward the river) and see Skytree framed by blooming cherry branches.
Look the other way (toward the river) and see Skytree framed by blooming cherry branches.

Best time to go: It’s always uncrowded, but because there are so few nice places to bring a lunch and eat outside in Tokyo, I like to buy take-out somewhere in Asakusa and bring my lunch here to eat it.

Admission: Free

DENPO-IN GARDEN

This secret garden is hidden right in the middle of the hustle and bustle of Senso-ji temple and it's only open around cherry blossom season, so most people don't even know it's there.
This secret garden is hidden right in the middle of the hustle and bustle of Senso-ji temple and it’s only open around cherry blossom season, so most people don’t even know it’s there.
You enter the garden by buying a ticket to the museum of giant prayer plaques (also interesting and seldom open). When you emerge out the back, a path leads to this beautiful pond.
You enter the garden by buying a ticket to the museum of giant prayer plaques (also interesting and seldom open). When you emerge out the back, a path leads to this beautiful pond.
There are two famous cherry trees in this garden – you can't miss them, and they do not disappoint!
There are two famous cherry trees in this garden – you can’t miss them, and they do not disappoint!
If you go early in the morning (it opens at 9:00) you might catch some reflections in the pond before the breeze kicks up.
If you go early in the morning (it opens at 9:00) you might catch some reflections in the pond before the breeze kicks up.

Best time to go: Early morning is the most uncrowded and serene time to see this garden. If you can get there at 9:00, it will just be you and the most fanatical of cameramen.

Admission: ¥300

SUMIDA RIVER PARK

Hordes of people crowd the walkways along the Sumida River, but they often miss this park when they turn inland on their way to Skytree.
Hordes of people crowd the walkways along the Sumida River, but they often miss this park when they turn inland on their way to Skytree.
From inside the Mimeguri Shrine, the cherry-shaded walkways beckon.
From inside the Mimeguri Shrine, the cherry-shaded walkways beckon.
And, of course, if you want cherry blossom-encrusted shots of the big Skytree thing, this is the place to whip out your camera.
And, of course, if you want cherry blossom-encrusted shots of the big Skytree thing, this is the place to whip out your camera.

Best time to go: Nice any time of day, less crowded in the mornings. People bring picnic lunches here to eat.

Admission: Free

SHINGASHI RIVER in Kawagoe

This town is just a twenty minute express train ride from Shinjuku Station, but the trees lining its little river are really worth seeing, plus it’s got a charming shopping street filled with traditional buildings that sell nice stuff.

Nice, right?
And even on the weekends, it’s not crowded
You can even take a little boat ride
And now they’ve started lighting it up at night!
Magical, don’t you think?

If you don’t mind sharing the pink fluffiness with lots of other flower aficionados, there are plenty more spectacular places to see cherry blossoms in Tokyo. Here are the best cherry blossom spots in Tokyo.

HANAMIMoat
Who knew the Imperial Palace moat could put on such a jaw-dropping display?

Of course, true cherry blossom warriors know that viewing doesn’t stop when the sun goes down. Here are the best places to see cherry blossoms lit up at night.

You can see why the Meguro River is no longer an undiscovered jewel of cherry blossom season...
You can see why the Meguro River is no longer an undiscovered jewel of cherry blossom season, but braving the crowds is worth it when they’re lit up at night!

And here’s where to find the cherry trees in each garden

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
 The Last Tea Bowl Thief was chosen as an Editor’s Pick for Best Mystery, Thriller & Suspense on Amazon

For three hundred years, a missing tea bowl passes from one fortune-seeker to the next, changing the lives of all who possess it…read more

“A fascinating mix of history and mystery.” —Booklist

Jonelle Patrick writes novels set in Japan, produces the monthly e-magazine Japanagram, and blogs at Only In Japan and The Tokyo Guide I Wish I’d Had

Published by Jonelle Patrick

Writes all the Japan things.

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