Epic Japanese Cake Show: Part 1

Multi-tiered cakes at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

No Japanese apartment comes equipped with an oven. That shocked me, until I stopped to think about it, and realized not a single traditional Japanese dish requires baking. Which doesn’t keep them from being some of the most skilled bakers in the world. Like the fiber artists of the Tokyo International Quilt Festival, the pastry chefs at the Japan Cake Show manage to take what used to be a very Western art and…turn it Japanese.

These may look like wedding cakes, but cake plays no part a traditional Japanese wedding, so these tend to celebrate other life events like…

Multi-tiered cakes at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

Welcoming a new little prince or princess into the world:

Multi-tiered cake at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

Throwing a tea party for your hundred best friends:

Multi-tiered cake at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

Uhhh…hydrangea season?

Multi-tiered cake at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

Shichi-go-san (the November coming-of-age ceremony for three-year-old girls, five-year-old boys, and seven-year-old girls):

Multi-tiered cake at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

Summer fireworks:

Multi-tiered cake at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

Political support for Ukraine, in edible form?

Multi-tiered cake at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

Okay, this one actually is for an autumn wedding:

Multi-tiered cake at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

And finally, a sculpture disguised as a cake to celebrate…the opening of a new kabuki play?

Sculptural cake at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

And naturally (this being Japan), the closer you get, the more amazing they are.

For example…all these filagree decorations and the fan-like yellow bits were hand-piped from white chocolate…

Detail of multi-tiered cake at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

…and everything you see here (even the flowers) is edible, made from either chocolate or fondant

Detail of multi-tiered cake at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

Which makes this next cake topper ever more mind-boggling! I think the only thing that’s not edible are the traditional mizuhiki colored wires used to wrap gift envelopes.

Detail of multi-tiered cake at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

And not only are the flowers perfectly formed, some are hand-painted with the kind of skill usually lavished on far more permanent canvases…

Detail of multi-tiered cake at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

…and sculpted to such perfection they could be mistaken for a museum exhibit

Detail of multi-tiered cake at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

Look at the “embroidery” on the kabuki costumes and the expression in the figures’ gestures!

Detail of multi-tiered cake at the Japan Cake Show Tokyo

Now that you’ve seen the “wedding” cakes, come back for Part Two: The spun sugar and chocolate sculptures!

The Japan Cake Show Tokyo usually runs for three days in mid-October and entry costs ¥1500 for adults. Details about the next one (in Japanese) are on the Tokyo Confectionary Associations website.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
 The Last Tea Bowl Thief was chosen as an Editor’s Pick for Best Mystery, Thriller & Suspense on Amazon

For three hundred years, a missing tea bowl passes from one fortune-seeker to the next, changing the lives of all who possess it…read more

“A fascinating mix of history and mystery.” —Booklist

Jonelle Patrick writes novels set in Japan, produces the monthly e-magazine Japanagram, and blogs at Only In Japan and The Tokyo Guide I Wish I’d Had

Published by Jonelle Patrick

Writes all the Japan things.

3 thoughts on “Epic Japanese Cake Show: Part 1

  1. I don’t think I could bear to cut into or eat any of those works of art. Wow. Hope you are having a wonderful time.

    D❣️🍵

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    1. Thank you, Diane! (Sorry for the late reply—I’ve been neglecting my blogging duties while running around and seeing what’s still here in Tokyo and what’s new since the last time I was here!)

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