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Where To See Huge Fields Of Cosmos In Tokyo

If you think that vast fields of blooming wildflowers are something you won’t find in Tokyo…think again! From mid-September to mid-October every year, the lowly cosmos is elevated to extravaganza status at two different gardens, blossoming in snapworthy profusion for about four weeks.

SHOWA KINEN PARK – Tachikawa

The first ones to bloom there (mid-September to mid-October) are the bright yellow ones
The cosmos season at this park last from mid-September to mid-October, starting with these orange ones (mid- to late-September)
Some years they plant this field in orange ones instead

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But this is the grand pooh-bah of cosmos extravaganzas. There are two seriously gigantic fields of these at this park.
The biggest one is a mix of purple, pink, white, and everything in between
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And peak blooming of the pink and purple ones happens from the end of September to the middle of October
As you can see, there are about a gazillion different varieties, if you look closely
If you look closely, there are about a gazillion different color variations

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And at the end (early- to mid-October) this pale yellow and white field comes into bloom
And at the end (early- to mid-October) this pale yellow and white field comes into bloom

This truly enormous park is about an hour from Shinjuku station, but is totally worth the trip during cosmos season. Photos can’t quite capture just how unexpectedly huge these fields are. There’s also a very nice Japanese garden, and the best playgrounds in Tokyo, if you have kids.

Admission: Adults ¥410, Children (6-14) ¥80
Hours: 9:30 – 16:30

Directions & Map

HAMA-RIKYU GARDEN – Tokyo (near Shiodome Station)

This park has a smaller field of cosmos, but it's still lovely, and has more of a color mix
This park has a smaller field of cosmos, but it’s still lovely, and has more of a color mix
From mid- to late-September, the orange ones are in full bloom
From mid- to late-September, the orange ones are in full bloom

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They plant two sections of mixed cosmos at staggered times – one blooms in mid-September, the other in early October
They plant two sections of mixed cosmos – one blooms in mid-September, the other in early October

This large garden is right in central Tokyo, and in addition to the cosmos field, there is a big pond you can walk around, with scenic bridges.

Admission: ¥300
Hours: 9:00 – 17:00
Map

And I know Mt. Fuji isn’t in Tokyo, but it you happen to be going that way…

HANA NO MIYAKO FLOWER PARK

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These cosmos are actually outside the paying part of the flower park! They are just growing along the road, in the fields surrounding it.

Admission: Free
Hours: Never closed

Here's the local area map, or you can search google maps for Hanako Miyako Park
Here’s the local area map, or you can search google maps for Hana no Miyako Park

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Jonelle Patrick View All

Writing mystery books set in Tokyo is mostly what I do, but I also blog about the odd stuff I see every day in Japan. I'm a graduate of Stanford University and the Sendagaya Japanese Institute in Tokyo, and a member of the International Thriller Writers, the Mystery Writers of America, and Sisters In Crime. When I'm not in Tokyo, I live in San Francisco. I also host a travel site called The Tokyo Guide I Wish I'd Had, so if you're headed to Japan and want to check out the places I take my friends when they're in town, take a look!

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