Epic Japanese Quilt Show

"Flowers Of The Cosmos" by Fumiko Nakayama

“Flowers Of The Cosmos” by Fumiko Nakayama

Let me just say right up front that this quilt show exceeded expectations in every way. Something I really love about Japan is that Art-With-A-Captial-A is defined so generously, and artists whose work requires many years of mastering the technical parts of making it are not dismissed as “craftsmen” but given full respect. And when that happens, you get this level of mind-boggling!

So, first of all, it’s no surprise that any showcase of Japanese quilts is going to feature insanely fractal levels of piecing and stitching perfection.

I do not want to know how many hours this took. ("???" by ?? Tanaka)

I do not want to know how many hours this took. (“Countless Flowers Blooming” by Kazuko Tanaka)

And this. Uh, yeah. ("Jack In The Box" by Keiko Ike)

And this. Yeah. (“Jack In The Box” by Keiko Ike)

And did I mention this? ("???" by ?? Tanaka)

And did I mention this? (“Mother’s Favorite Winter Peonies” by Mineko Miyashita)

Now that we’ve got that out of the way, here are a few I thought you might enjoy, because they were especially Only In Japan delights.

This one is simple, but it not only has a super Japanese theme (those oddly compelling orange paper lantern thingies), it shows them in a very "autumn" way, with end-of-the-season, bug-eaten leaves.

This one is simple, but it not only has a super Japanese theme (those oddly compelling orange paper lantern thingies), it shows them in a very “autumn” way, with end-of-the-season, bug-eaten leaves. (“Silver Hammock” by Kumiko Morita)

This one takes the J-theme all the way, even using quilting patterns that are traditional washi paper and kimono motifs.

This one takes the J-theme all the way, even using quilting patterns that are traditional washi paper and kimono motifs. (“Distant Memory” by Kumiko Tada)

This design turns the usual "autumn" motifs into a fine piece of graphic goodness.

This one turns some typical “autumn” motifs into a slice of graphic goodness. Bonus points for the hand-dyed indigo bits. (“Soon The Wind Will Bring Winter” by Kumi Ohkawa)

And of course, there had to be cherry blossoms. On steroids.

And of course, there were cherry blossoms. On steroids. (“Cherry Blossoms” by Masako Sakagami)

This lovely manages to use traditional piecing, but the design and colors were gorgeously Not Your Usual Western Choices. ("Infinite" by Etsuko Ishitobi)

This lovely manages to use traditional piecing, but the design and colors were gorgeously Not Your Usual Western Choices. (“Infinite” by Etsuko Ishitobi)

And some of the subjects felt poignantly Japanese, and I was susprised when the artist wasn't. ("Garden Nasturtium" by Jungsun Jung)

Some of the subjects felt poignantly Japanese, and I was surprised when the artist wasn’t. (“Garden Nasturtium” by Jungsun Jung)

This super-Japanese forest landscape with higanbana really stopped me, because I've been to that place! ("??" by ??)

This Japanese forest landscape really stopped me in my tracks, because I RECOGNIZED it! I’ve been to that place! (“Sunbeams Between The Trees” by Hiroko Oouchi)

Speaking of landscape quilts, a few artists have pioneered completely new techniques of stitchery. This one is made of THOUSANDS of cloth snippets, quilted onto tulle, then sewed into a quilt. The photo really can't do it justice – IRL it was astoundingly painterly and quilt-y at the same time. ("??" by ??)

Speaking of landscape quilts, a few artists have pioneered completely new techniques of stitchery. This one is made of THOUSANDS of cloth snippets, in a sort of avant garde form of applique. The photo really can’t do it justice – IRL it was astoundingly painterly and quilt-y at the same time. (“The Street of Golden Leaves” by Keiko Kimura)

Others were amazing because all those pieces that look like printed fabric were actually...

Others were amazing because all those pieces that look like printed fabric were actually…

...hand-embroidered, using traditional Japanese sashiko techniques. O_O ("Flower Embroidery" by ??)

…hand-embroidered, using traditional Japanese sashiko techniques. O_O (“Kaleidoscope” by Hideko Onozaki)

This is what might happen if Escher had made quilts using Japanese maple and ginkgo leaves ("??" by ??)

This is what might happen if Escher had made quilts using Japanese maple and ginkgo leaves and carp (“Ultimate Autumn” by Reiko Nakahara)

("With Auntie" by Naoko ??

And yeah, I know they have cats outside of Japan but…cats. (“Tea With Mom” by Naoko Suzuki)

Jonelle Patrick is the author of the Only In Tokyo mystery series, now out for the first time in paperback!

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